From the AlzAuthors Blog: Meet Tamara Prosper, author of “The Elders,” a Collection of Short Stories

Elders are not merely old people. Regardless of their current condition, at heart they’re still parents, spouses, teachers, veterans, housekeepers, artists, entrepreneurs, farmers, neighbors, caregivers, and friBy Tamara Prosper

Ever since I can remember trying to navigate through grief, frustration, anxiety, anger and sometimes even joy, writing has been the compass that lead me to equilibrium. Seven months after uprooting my family by moving from our home in a major southern city to take what I expected to be my dream job as the Administrator of a beautiful nursing home in rural North Carolina, I was exhausted, frustrated, angry and depressed. My children had quickly adjusted to our new environment. My husband seemed to be moving forward in his business endeavors. He and the children appeared to be quite content with everything except for the fact that I spent very little time with them. My friends lived far away and I had little time to make new friends so I poured my feelings into journals.

When saddened by the unexpected death of a resident, I wrote. When I was frustrated by demands from the corporate office, I wrote. When angered by the unrealistic expectations of resident’s family members and when my character was questioned, I wrote. When my staff was mistreated and when we celebrated our first deficiency-free annual state survey, I wrote. I wrote of individuals that I worked with before moving to North Carolina. I wrote my imagined explanations for the exasperating behavior of certain residents and their loved ones. I placidly withstood and gently addressed blatantly disrespectful behavior from a resident’s family member, then filled pages with the fury that had been veiled behind my calm demeanor. Hurt feelings, sweet memories, righteous indignation, joy, sorrow, celebration, dread, and voracious hope flowed from my spirit to my journals.

book cover (1)In nine months I had written and edited more than a dozen stories, finally choosing those that I believed were worthy of sharing with the world. I wanted people to see the humanity of elders and their caregivers. Elders are not merely old people. Regardless of their current condition, at heart they’re still parents, spouses, teachers, veterans, housekeepers, artists, entrepreneurs, farmers, neighbors, caregivers, and friends. They want what everyone wants – to enjoy a good meal, to laugh at a funny story, to spend time with loved ones, and to contribute to the world. Caregivers, whether professionals or responsible loved ones, are among the unrecognized heroes of our society. They give far more than they receive, simply because they know it must be done. By sharing varying perspectives and situations I seek to make these truths known.

By having a glimpse into the lives of The Elders, people may recognize someone they know or have a frame of reference for someone in the future. I want people to feel a connection with The Elders so they will empathize with and advocate for the elders in their communities.

Purchase The Elders

About the Author

Tamara G. ProsperI’m an Aging Services Professional with a sincere love for older adults and a resolute desire to see them thrive throughout all stages of life. I work directly with elders in organizations that support their care. I share as much information as possible with as many elders and caregivers as possible, to prepare, inform, educate and encourage them as they experience aging. I’m thankful to have received very positive feedback from readers.

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For more extraordinary books about Alzheimer’s and dementia please visit the AlzAuthors Bookstore.  Reposted with permission of AlzAuthors, the global community of authors and readers whose lives have been touched by Alzheimer’s and dementia. I am a co-founder and admin.

From the AlzAuthors Blog: Ellen Smith Discusses Her Alzheimer’s Novel “Reluctant Cassandra”

EllenSmithFeaturedImage

By Ellen Smith

Reluctant Cassandra came to me first as a title. I’ve always been fascinated by Greek mythology and especially with the character of Cassandra. She was given the gift of prophecy along with the curse that her warnings would never be believed. In Greek mythology, Cassandra’s story ends with the fall of Troy—a tragedy she foresaw but was unable to prevent.

What would it be like to see the future and still be helpless to change the outcome? Unfortunately, I’ve lived that experience. Many of us have. When I wrote my own version of a modern-day Cassandra story, I imagined a woman whose father had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. She could see clearly that his health was deteriorating, but it was still so hard for her and her family to accept the future that was unfolding.

Reluctant Cassandra LargeThe journey that my characters took through anticipatory grief was very similar to what I had just been through in my personal life. I actually wrote Reluctant Cassandra the year after I lost my son. Living through his diagnosis and passing was a heartbreak I hadn’t been able to put into words, but when I stepped into this fictional world, the pain of my own Cassandra experience poured out.

While writing Reluctant Cassandra was cathartic, the story continued to take on a life of its own after publication. Only a week after my release date, I received my first letter from a reader. She had connected strongly with the story because it mirrored her own experience after her father was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. I was so touched that she reached out to share that with me—in fact, I still have her email printed out and pinned over my desk! Her letter was later joined by more notes from other members of the Alzheimer’s community. Here I had written this story at a time when I felt so alone and now it was connecting with readers from all over.

In the three years since Reluctant Cassandra was published, I’ve continued to write and advocate for those with Alzheimer’s. I released a short story collection loosely based on the setting of Reluctant Cassandra on Channillo for Charity, with all proceeds going to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. Even though I didn’t know anyone with Alzheimer’s when I was first writing Reluctant Cassandra, this disease now has many faces for me. I see those who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s themselves, as well as their families, friends, and caregivers. I’m grateful to them for telling me their stories, and honored that they are willing to hear mine, too.

This is the true gift of a story: it reaches across the barriers of time and place and circumstance and allows us to connect with each other. The Greek myth of Cassandra was first told hundreds of years ago, and yet the story still impacted me as a 21st century reader. My novel was inspired by a grief I couldn’t put in to words, but writing this story allowed me to become a part of the Alzheimer’s community. I could never have imagined where the book would lead me when I first thought of the title years ago. I am beyond grateful that it brought me here.

author headshotAbout the Author

Ellen Smith is the author of Reluctant Cassandra, Every Last Minute, and the Channillo for Charity series Ghosts of Eagle Valley, which benefits the Alzheimer’s Association. When she isn’t busy writing, Ellen can usually be found reading, crafting, or playing piano. No matter what she is doing, Ellen is always wondering, “What if?” Ellen lives with her family near Washington, DC.

 

 

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For more extraordinary books about Alzheimer’s and dementia please visit the AlzAuthors Bookstore. Reposted with permission of AlzAuthors, the global community of authors and readers whose lives have been touched by Alzheimer’s and dementia. I am a co-founder and admin.

From the AlzAuthors Blog: AlzAuthors Launches Its “Inspiration Collection” During Cruise Dementia Conference

AlzAuthors is thrilled to join a new cruise and conference designed for those living with early-stage Alzheimer’s, their caregivers, and their loved ones. The AlzAuthors Inspiration Collection: Extraordinary Books about Alzheimer’s and Dementia will sail to the Caribbean April 6-13 during the inaugural Connecting Circles of Care and Building Bridges of Hope Cruise & Conference, an empowering 7-day retreat experience that offers respite and education.

Lisa Chirico

“Our cruise and conference provide an opportunity for attendees to benefit from a wide range of programming created for their complex and stressful lives,” says Lisa Marie Chirico, Dementia Caregiver Cruise and Conference Producer. “Additionally, the tropical wonders and beauty of the Caribbean offer healing for both the body and the spirit, so it’s a perfect pairing.” Chirico was a full-time caregiver for her father, who had Alzheimer’s disease, and is passionate about supporting dementia caregivers and their families. She currently works as a Nursing Home Navigator Coach for clients experiencing long-term care at Nursinghomeology.com.

We are deeply grateful to a generous sponsor who has underwritten the costs of bringing this collection of books to the cruise conference. A cross-section of memoirs, novels, caregiving guides and more from our bookstore will be selected for inclusion based on the needs of conference attendees. In addition, each participant will receive a copy of our anthology, Alzheimer’s and Dementia Caregiving Stories, Volume 1.

A distinguished panel of dementia and senior care practitioners and professionals will join Chirico for this conference, including AlzAuthors co-founder and manager Marianne Sciucco. An experienced cruiser, Sciucco is excited to join the cruise and conference, and remembers one cruise where she encountered a woman with dementia and her attentive family several times throughout the week.

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“I was pleased to see the family taking a vacation together but had lots of questions,” she says. “How were the woman’s special needs being met? What if she wandered away from her family and got lost? Which activities were meaningful to her? What happened when the ship docked, and the family went on excursions? Did she join them or stay behind? Who watched over her? The whole thing seemed complicated. A cruise experience that addresses these special concerns is a wonderful opportunity for these families to grab some needed respite and make lifelong memories.”

Sciucco will present her program, “How Three Daughters of Dementia Started AlzAuthors, a Global Community of Writers Sharing their Dementia Stories,” and will also present a Book Club-style meeting for her novel Blue Hydrangeas, an Alzheimer’s love story for attendees who read the book prior to departure.

Additional presenters include:

  • Jeff Borghoff, Living with and Fighting the War on Alzheimer’s Disease With Love Action: “Embracing Change and Living Confidently With Alzheimer’s Disease”
  • Lisa Marie Chirico, Cruise and Conference Producer, and Nursing Home Navigator Coach: “Resilience Strategies I Wish I’d Known When I Was a Caregiver”
  • Daniel J. Hutcherson, Financial Gerontologist, and 20-year Wall Street Veteran: “The Six Domains of Financial Exploitation: Protecting Your Money and Your Independence”
  • Peter Maeck, Writer, Photographer, Teacher, and Speaker: “Remembrance of Things Present: Making Peace with Dementia”
  • Christy Turner, Founder of Dementia Sherpa: “The Dementia Sherpa’s Roadmap to Being the Best Darn Dementia Care Partner You Can Be (Even When You’re Feeling Worn Out or Frustrated)”
  • Gene Saunders, Founder & CEO, Project Lifesaver International: “Discover How Project Lifesaver Protects Your Loved One and Provides Your Family with Peace of Mind”
  • Daphne Glover Ferrier, Award-Winning Film Producer, and Co-owner of Backfin Media: “SPENT – The Hidden Cost of Dementia”
  • Loretta Anderson, Independent Healthcare Researcher Investigating Lifestyle Interventions in Alzheimer’s Disease and Healthy Brain Aging: “New Lifestyle Interventions for People With Dementia and Their Caregivers”

This cruise is suitable for those in the earlier stages of Alzheimer’s, and their caregivers and other family members, as well as practitioners and advocates who focus on healthy aging, gerontology, brain health, and dementia.

Couple in hug sitting together at the Caribbean Sea

The seven-day cruise and conference sails to the Caribbean on Holland America’s MS Oosterdam and departs from Fort Lauderdale, FL on April 6th, 2019 with stops in Key West; Turks and Caicos; Amber Cove, Dominican Republic; and Holland America’s award-winning private island Half Moon Cay, Bahamas. All cruise reservations must be made through Jody McShea at DePrez Travel Bureau, Inc., who can be reached at (585) 442-8900, extension 208, or via email at jmcshea@depreztravel.com.

For additional information contact Lisa Marie Chirico, Dementia Caregiver Cruise and Conference Producer, at lisa@nursinghomeology.com or call her at (646) 784-7629.

Holland America’s MS Oosterdam

From the AlzAuthors Blog: Jessica Bryan Returns with “The Mighty Ant – An Anthology of Short Stories for Seniors”

_just like the little ant, whose size is disproportionate to its strength, so can stories have strong impact, regardless of their length._
By Jessica Bryan

I am an author of over 28 books who has always shared my stories with my mother. Sadly, Mom suffers from Alzheimer’s, and as the disease has progressed she no longer comprehends more intricate plots, nor can she focus on longer, more detailed stories.  As a consequence, I began reading short stories to her. I noticed that after reading something more easily comprehended, there was often something in the tale that sparked a memory and conversation.  “Do you remember gardening?” I asked her after reading about a gardener. It brought a sweet reminiscent moment that included smiles and even laughter. That spawned my idea for a book of short stories specifically dedicated to the elderly with cognitive issues and their caregivers who often search for activities that will provide quality time with their loved ones.

the mighty ant

Recently, I was involved in a project for the county to discuss the needs of aging communities. It was abundantly clear that caregiving services were needed without enough funding to provide these services. I thought that I could combine the idea of a book of short stories for seniors with a fundraiser for the Council on Aging.

I put out a call for submissions from authors who might be interested in participating, asking for a donation of short stories with a focus on brevity and simplicity.  The profits from the book sales would be given to North Carolina’s Chatham County Council on Aging.  The authors were more than happy to generously share their work with no thoughts of remuneration.  The results were submissions from all over the world. They were charming, memory and conversation-provoking stories from 33 authors.

Editing was difficult because of the 55 stories that were accepted there were so many others that were submitted. Late nights and reading aloud to my wonderful husband helped narrow down the choices. Not all the writers were authors. Many were people who simply wanted to participate and believed in the cause. Many had been or currently were caregivers themselves and could relate to the needs of caregivers and their loved ones for whom they were caring.

The title of the book came to me one day as I observed a little black ant carrying something large to its nest. I thought about the strength of an ant. Titling the anthology The Mighty Ant I explained on the cover, “Just like the little ant, whose size is disproportionate to its strength, so can stories have strong impact, regardless of their length.”

In addition to my own stories I wrote for the anthology, I’ve also written many other books ranging from fiction, Young Adult fiction, children’s books, to non-fiction (humor, self-help, and inspirational) books. My four-book series on caregiving has been described as books that should be required reading for those involved in caregiving because they are helpful, informative, raw, humorous, truthful, and real accounts of what a caregiver actually experiences.

Several AlzAuthors are featured in this anthology: Angela G. Gentile, Irene Olson, Marianne Sciucco, and Vicki Tapia.

Purchase The Mighty Ant

jessica bryanAbout the Author

Jessica Bryan lives in North Carolina where she is a real estate broker and an active advocate for caregivers and care receivers. Jessica has written all her life, but during the past few years she began writing full-length books, including fiction and non-fiction, books for young adults, and some wonderful Juvenile action-adventure books.  Her interest in writing about caregiving began when her mother came to live with her and her wonderful husband, Skip. Jessica loves to laugh and claims that her sense of humor shines though all of her books regardless of the subject matter.

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 For more extraordinary books about Alzheimer’s and dementia please visit the AlzAuthors Bookstore.

Reposted with permission of AlzAuthors, the global community of authors
and readers whose lives have been touched by Alzheimer’s and dementia.
I am a co-founder and admin.

From the AlzAuthors Blog: Meet Gincy Heins, Editor of “Before the Diagnosis – Stories of Life and Love Before Dementia”

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By Gincy Heins

As I was texting a friend who would be meeting my family for the first time, I realized she would never know so many aspects of my husband, and I started to cry.

She would never know the person who talked easily and could captivate people with his stories about working at Disneyland. She would never know this man who could repair anything that needed fixing in our house and was called by other people to answer their home repair questions. Instead, she would see my husband as a rather quiet person who didn’t have a lot of confidence in his abilities and often couldn’t make a decision about the simplest things.

Wiping my tears, I thought of the many incredible people I now know who had Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. I got a glimpse of who they were through stories their spouses told, and I wanted other people to see how amazing all these people were. Whether they were amazing because they were highly respected in their career or they lovingly raised their family, I felt their stories should be told.

I emailed everyone I knew whose loved one had any type of dementia and told them I had an idea for a book sharing stories about who our loved ones were before they had a dementia diagnosis. I reached out through social media and I asked Alzheimer’s Orange County to help me spread the word. When being filmed for a MyAlzhemer’s video I invited the producer to share a story. I reached out to as many people as I could.

I had no idea if anyone would respond positively, or at all. I hoped for ten stories and was thrilled when I received 36 contributions! This was so much more than I dreamed of receiving!

gincy coverI enlisted two friends to help with the editing. Together we read through each contribution many times and edited for clarity, all the while trying to keep each person’s story in their voice. All authors approved the final version of their story.

Finding the perfect publishing option was a challenge, but I knew we would find the best way to publish this important work. Most publishers never responded. One was very interested in the concept, but didn’t want to deal with a book involving 36 authors. Self-publishing had too many considerations. A friend came to the rescue and handled that for me. Whew!

On March 12, 2018, Before the Diagnosis: Stories of Life and Love Before Dementia was published on lulu.com (and is now available there as well as from Amazon and Barnes & Noble). This anthology of 36 stories has been well-received and shows that people are not forgotten or unimportant because of their diagnosis.

As of the end of December, over 230 copies of the book in print and digital formats have been sold. Each of the 36 authors who participated in this book were given the option of donating their share of the earnings or retaining them. I am thrilled that over 90% of the revenue is being donated to one of four nonprofit organizations: Alzheimer’s Orange County, Alzheimer’s Association, Lewy Body Dementia Association and Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation.

Purchasing this book gives back to organizations that help us on this journey, benefitting all of us.

About the Author

Gincy Heins

Gincy Heins is the creator and editor of Before the Diagnosis: Stories of Life and Love Before Dementia and one of the co-authors of the 365 Caregiving Tips: Practical Tips from Everyday Caregivers series of books.

She teaches classes for older adults, is a Senior Commissioner for Cypress, CA, speaks at conferences and on panel discussions, and volunteers at the public library and with Alzheimer’s Orange County. She and her husband are the proud parents of one grown son.

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From the AlzAuthors Blog: Meet Susan Cushman and Her Memoir “Tangles & Plaques”

cushman, susan

By Susan Cushman

My mother, Effie Johnson, was second generation Alzheimer’s. Her mother, Emma Sue (for whom I was named) died from Alzheimer’s when she was 87 years old in 1986, in the same nursing home in Jackson, Mississippi where my mother would spend the final eight years of her life. I remember watching my mother care for “Mamaw” and wondering what our future might bring.

Twenty years later, in 2006, I moved Mother into assisted living. My father had died of cancer in 1998, leaving Mother alone. After eight years of watching her gradual decline and taking on more of her day-to-day responsibilities, especially her finances, I offered first to move her in with us—which she declined—and second to move her to Memphis to an assisted living home. She begged me to let her stay in Jackson, which I did. This meant I would spend the next ten years making the 400-mile round trip to participate in her caregiving, although she did have help, first in assisted living, and finally in a nursing home. Continue reading

From the AlzAuthors Blog: Robyn Hollingworth and “My Mad Dad: The Diary of an Unraveling Mind”

My Mad Dad Canva

By Robyn Hollingworth

About ten years ago my life took a turn. I guess you would say it took a turn for the worse, but really, it just changed. I was in my mid-twenties, living in London and working in fashion. My father  was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in his early 60s, and within the year, I had moved back to small-town south Wales to help my mum look after him.

His decline was swift, his actions included (at the start) repetition of stories, misplacing items, and accidentally putting on Mum’s cardigan to go to the shops – so far, standard! He had really mellowed and was fairly stoic and philosophical about the illness, often making jokes about his forgetfulness, even though it must have been terrifying for him. Then life took a turn for the “even worse.” Mum was diagnosed with terminal cancer and passed away just three months after I moved home. The effect this had on dad was profound and catastrophic. The seismic shift in the family dynamic tipped him right over the edge. By this point, my older brother was also in residence, but still we couldn’t give dad the level of care he needed. One day he mistook me for a burglar and came at me with a knife. It was at this point that we had to seek more help and Dad went into a care home. Continue reading